As we melt in Beijing’s scorching heat, I’ve enjoyed viewing various institutions’ graduation photos and speeches. One piece that stood out was Arch Montgomery’s, Head of Asheville School (full disclosure, I’m a grad!), “What are we celebrating?” 

I’m curious whether or not Chinese families are beginning to reflect upon the questions posed by Arch or if we’ll continue to read stories about graduation being an opportunity for luxury good shopping sprees.

Whatever the thoughts and feelings Chinese families have surrounding graduation, there is a possibility we will begin seeing fewer Chinese graduate students, as The Council of Graduate Schools reported “a one percent decline in applications from China.  I wonder if the dangerous glut of graduate students looking for employment is triggering this decline.

In the standardized testing world, Wesleyan University is the latest institution to use optional submission of SAT and ACT scores. Even as more institutions question the effectiveness of test scores in the admissions process, the Chinese aren’t taking any chances. China’s now the top purchaser of digital English language learning products worldwide.

In other news, regional admissions offices in China like Mount Holyoke’s in Shanghai, are helping to prepare Chinese students for their new social environment. It was also nice to see a student radio piece covering the lives of Chinese students at Tulane University. As Chinese students feel more comfortable on US campuses, we might see more on-campus marriage proposals likethese two lovebirds at Clark University!

That’s all for May!

Cheers

(Links in order of appearance)

What Are We Celebrating?
Chinese Students Graduate In US To Luxury Goods Shopping Spree
International Graduate Applications Rebound In Preliminary Estimates For 2014
China’s Dangerous Graduate Glut
Wesleyan Makes Tests Optional In Admissions
Surging Global Demand For Digital Language Learning
University Admissions Diary : Setting Up Shop In China
Chinese Students In U.S. Universities
College Town

This is the seventeenth issue of Inside China Ed, a news digest feature of the Vericant newsletter. All Inside China Ed newsletters become available on the Vericant Blog a week after it is sent to our newsletter subscribers. If you would like to receive the Inside China Ed newsletter in your inbox, please subscribe to our newsletter – it’s fast, easy, and best of all, free!

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